marthajefferson:

theladybadass:

Newsreel from 1944 covering I Am an American Day, promoted through the United States Immigration and Naturalization Service.

Thirty-five nations celebrated at the Pasadena Rose Bowl. The nations/groups featured in this gif set are India, Greece, Korea, Poland, Holland, Hungary, Scotland, France, Mexico, Native American (referred to as Original Americans in the 1944 newsreel), the Philippines, and China.

Why did I have no idea Gary Cooper was so good looking?
sinatraswooners:

Gary Cooper, 1930

Why did I have no idea Gary Cooper was so good looking?

sinatraswooners:

Gary Cooper, 1930

loveless422:

Laurette Luez and Edmond O’Brien in D.O.A. (1950).

loveless422:

Laurette Luez and Edmond O’Brien in D.O.A. (1950).

Pictures of Hope and William together are incredibly hard to find…

feminhistory:

In The Days of Sappho by John William Godward, 1904

 Sappho was a Greek lyric poet born on the island of Lesbos. Born between 630 and 612 BC, little is known about the events in her life. Sadly much of her poetry, which was well-known and greatly admired by her temporaries, has been lost. Nonetheless her reputation as one of the greatest lyrical poets of her time continues to endure through surviving fragments. Sappho’s poetry centered on passion and love for various people and both sexes and the word lesbian derives from the name of the island of her birth, while her name is also the origin of the word ‘sapphic’. 
“Some say the Muses are nine: how careless! Look, there’s Sappho too, from Lesbos, the tenth." - Plato 
“Solon of Athens heard his nephew sing a song of Sappho’s over the wine and, since he liked the song so much, he asked the boy to teach it to him. When someone asked him why, he said: So that I may learn it, then die." - Stobaeus
Sappho’s work remained a popular topic of study and entertainment well into the Roman period. However as Attic and Homeric Greek became the predominant languages of study, Sappho’s poetry, written in her native Aeolic Greek, began to lose popularity. Nevertheless, the great Roman poets and philosophers continued to compare and study her poetry and it is through their descriptions that we are able to access fragmented versions of her literary works today.

feminhistory:

In The Days of Sappho by John William Godward, 1904

Sappho was a Greek lyric poet born on the island of Lesbos. Born between 630 and 612 BC, little is known about the events in her life. Sadly much of her poetry, which was well-known and greatly admired by her temporaries, has been lost. Nonetheless her reputation as one of the greatest lyrical poets of her time continues to endure through surviving fragments. Sappho’s poetry centered on passion and love for various people and both sexes and the word lesbian derives from the name of the island of her birth, while her name is also the origin of the word ‘sapphic’.

Some say the Muses are nine: how careless! Look, there’s Sappho too, from Lesbos, the tenth." - Plato

Solon of Athens heard his nephew sing a song of Sappho’s over the wine and, since he liked the song so much, he asked the boy to teach it to him. When someone asked him why, he said: So that I may learn it, then die." - Stobaeus

Sappho’s work remained a popular topic of study and entertainment well into the Roman period. However as Attic and Homeric Greek became the predominant languages of study, Sappho’s poetry, written in her native Aeolic Greek, began to lose popularity. Nevertheless, the great Roman poets and philosophers continued to compare and study her poetry and it is through their descriptions that we are able to access fragmented versions of her literary works today.

feminhistory:

Oil on canvas, previously attributed to Johann Zoffany, 1779;

Dido Elizabeth Belle is depicted here with her cousin Elizabeth Murray. This painting scandalised many of it’s 18th century audience due to its portrayal of Belle, a woman of colour, in a non-subservient position. Considered to be one of the first paintings to do so, it was probably commissioned by Belle’s father Admiral Sir John Lindsay in the late 1770’s. 

feminhistory:

Oil on canvas, previously attributed to Johann Zoffany, 1779;

Dido Elizabeth Belle is depicted here with her cousin Elizabeth Murray. This painting scandalised many of it’s 18th century audience due to its portrayal of Belle, a woman of colour, in a non-subservient position. Considered to be one of the first paintings to do so, it was probably commissioned by Belle’s father Admiral Sir John Lindsay in the late 1770’s. 

vintagegal:

Bad Girls of Pulp Art (via)

part one (x)

heckyesbritishmusic:

The key to Smiths dancing: 50% seduction…the other 50% is seduction as well.

“Her blonde hair was part of an attempt to to start over and adopt a new persona, following her first suicide attempt in August of 1953.“Plath, who had spent six months in psychiatric care following the suicide attempt, had seemed to improve greatly by the the summer of 1954. This period of time has been lovingly referred to by her biographers as her “platinum summer.”